ArchiDirector – Whimsical Illustrations by Frederico Babino

ARCHIDIRECTOR_city-01_700
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

Labor Day weekend always makes me think about film. Several times over the years I have made a pilgrimage to Telluride Colorado, a tiny enclave buried deep within the San Juan mountains, to attend their festival that always falls on this holiday. Sometimes my husband Tony came with me, yet mostly I would go alone. Getting there isn’t easy and requires several plane rides. One time I took a six-seater that landed at Telluride’s airport – a small patch of flattened mountain 10,000 feet high. Once we landed and I knew for sure that I hadn’t died during the experience, I vowed never to do that again. Another year I drove from Durango in a worn rental car without a spare tire or a cell phone. I had only a gas station map and a radio that worked intermittently due to the altitude. It took hours to navigate what felt like dozens of snaking, river-flanked roads through two national parks and past many lifeless small towns. And yet, no matter the journey, it was always worth it as every time I attended I got to see extraordinary films by emerging and well-known directors and meet interesting and thoughtful attendees. Some were famous, most were not, yet we all felt connected by our pure love of the art. I’ll always remember an unforgettable night when I spoke to the director and film historian Peter Bogdanovich about the future of independent cinema while standing under a full moon peeking out of high clouds just rising over the mountain’s crest. He encouraged me to stay true to my passion, which I have done over the years. And so, while missing what has become a treasured experience I was thrilled when I came upon this series by Barcelona-based, Italian architect and graphic artist Frederico Babino.

 

 

Photo curtesy of Frederico Babino
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

ArchiDirector is a delicious and clever imagining of the homes of some of Babino’s most favorite movie directors. Each of the 27 illustrations contain clues to the movies that made them famous as Babino has interpreted details of each director’s greatest film into a structural language with elements highlighted by materials and color. It is a joyful look at the intersection of design and film.

 

 

federico-babina-archidirector-illustration-designboom-24 - Kubrick
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

Director Stanley Kubric’s house is a sort of crooked smiling face with the lens-eye of 2001’s murderous computer Hal staring out at us.

 

 

Curtesy of Frederico Babino
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

Wes Anderson’s home is complete with somewhat unrecognizable boat and train windows at its bottom that only those who are Anderson devotees (like me!) will know are from his films The Grand Budapest Hotel, The Darjeeling Limited and The Life Aquatic Steve Zissou.

 

 

Photo curtesy of Frederico Babino
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

“Directors are like the architects of cinema,” says Babino. “They are those that build stories that like buildings envelop the viewer and carry it in a different world each with their own style, language and aesthetics.”

 

 

Photo curtesy of Frederico Babino
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

Babino’s website has several other series worth noting, including another film-inspired group entitled ArchiCine, which is his interpretation of houses from some of the most iconic films from all of film history.

 

 

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Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

“The architecture is like a scene from a movie where the story is the life, the script is dictated by the use of the building and where the actors are the residents. A labyrinth where all – characters, director, audience –are lost and found in the intensity of their emotions,” says Babino.

 

 

federico-babina-archidirector-illustration-designboom-22 - Lynch
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

David Lynch is a director known for surreal and disturbing films and television shows. The curtains in this poster represent the red room an odd, extra-dimensional place seen only in the dreams of Special Agent Dale Cooper, the protagonist of the wildly imaginative television series Twin Peaks.

 

federico-babina-archidirector-illustration-designboom-04 - Scott
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

This poster refers to director Ridley Scott‘s best known futuristic, slightly dystopian, neo-noir, science fiction, horror films: Alien and Blade Runner.

 

federico-babina-archidirector-illustration-designboom-10
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

Italian director and screenwriter Frederico Fellini was heavily influenced by neorealism and the work of Carl Jung and is best known for his films La Dolce Vita, Satyricon, La Strada, and Amacord.

 

federico-babina-archidirector-illustration-designboom-25 - Hitchcock
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

This poster refers to several of Alfred Hitchcock’s most suspenseful, psychological thrillers: Psycho (the basic shape of the house – mostly notably its top floor with the oval window and square-shaped roof); Vertigo (the men hanging off the fire escape and the rooftop); Rear Window (the double long penthouse-like windows); North By Northwest (the bottom floor’s rock facade); Rope (the two men and the credenza in the large room).

 

federico-babina-archidirector-illustration-designboom-13 - Kazan
Photo courtesy of Frederico Babino

Elia Kazan’s masterpiece On The Waterfront takes place near the docks of Hoboken, New Jersey where one character keeps pigeons on the roof, and another played by Marlon Brando, in his most memorable role, is seen as a stool pigeon after he informs on the corrupt goings on of his longshoremen union bosses.

 

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